Census - All Blogs

Top tip - Genes Reunited blogs

Welcome to the new Genes Reunited blog!

  • We regularly add blogs covering a variety of topics. You can add your own comments at the bottom.
  • The Genes Reunited Team will be writing blogs and keeping you up to date with changes happening on the site.
  • In the future we hope to have guest bloggers that will be able to give you tips and advice as to how to trace your family history.
  • The blogs will have various privacy settings, so that you can choose who you share your blog with.

New Military Records

New military records

Was your ancestor a war hero?

View thousands of brand new military records, including Chelsea Pensioner records, Military Nurses, Prisoners of war and much more.

View military records today

William Shakespeare's birthday is celebrated every April in Stratford-upon-Avon, his birthplace, with a costumed parade. He was baptised on 26 April, and is thought to have been born on or near 23 April.


Scottish records now on Genes Reunited


Published in Genes News on 20 Dec 2012 16:12 : scottish census : 19 comments : 5763 views

We are extremely excited here in the office today as we have just added Scottish records to the site. We have the Scottish census collection from 1841 right the way through to 1901. So, for those of you with Scottish ancestry you can now start filling in the gaps.


Complete 1911 Census on Genes Reunited


Published in Genes Reunited Blog on 9 Dec 2010 17:00 : 1911 census : 0 comments : 391 views

In May of this year we launched the 1911 census Enumerator Summary Books. This was the first time that our members were able to access any records from the 1911 census and the first time that a census included intimate questions to the population that put their lives in context.


Is this a censusible idea?


Published in Genes Reunited Blog on 1 Jul 2010 17:00 : census : 0 comments : 415 views

Much debated about amongst genealogists this week is Statistics Canada's decision to scrap traditional, detailed census forms in favour for shorter forms, causing some controversy within the world of genealogy. Interestingly enough I wonder what affect this will have on future genealogist trying to research their family tree in centuries to come?