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IRISH Surnames - Origins etc.

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 10 Apr 2009 23:44

Surname: Kenny
This most interesting surname is of Old Gaelic origin, found in Scotland and Ireland, and is the Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O Cionnaoith", composed of the Gaelic prefix "O", male descendant of, and the personal name "Coinneach", an Old Irish personal name borne by a 6th Century monk and saint who gave his name to the town of Kilkenny, "Church of Coinneach". The name is the seventy-sixth most popular name in Ireland, and the majority of the people so called belong to Counties Roscommon and Galway. The O'Kenny sept formed part of the Ui Maine (Hy Many) tribe. By coincidence Kenny is also the name of a prominent English family from Somerset, who through extensive intermarriage with County Galway families became important landowners there and in Roscommon. They descended from Nicholas Kenny, Escheator-General for Ireland under Elizabeth 1. The name in Scotland, may, in some instances, be the Anglicized form of the Gaelic personal name "Cionaodha", perhaps composed of "cion", respect, affection, and "Aodh", the pagan god of fire. The surname is first recorded in England because record keeping in Ireland has been perforce erratic since the 12th Century due to the upheavals of war and occupation. Rev. P.J. Kenny S.J. (1779 - 1841), was founder of Clongoweswood College, an exclusive private school in Ireland, and was one of the most distinguished Catholic preachers in the 19th Century. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Matyle Kennie, which was dated February 14th 1563, at St. Andrew's, Holborn, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 10 Apr 2009 23:45

http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?

this is the site to find the meaning of surnames

Valerie

Valerie Report 13 May 2009 22:35

hi teresa would be interested in mclaughlin

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 May 2009 00:23

Surname: Mclaughlin
Recorded in many forms including MacLaughlin, MacLoughlin, McLaughlin and McLauchlin, this is an ancient Irish surname. It derives from a pre 10th century Old Gaelic name borne by two entirely distinct clans. The first was originally called the O' Maoilsheachlann' and in the 17th century assumed the name MacLoughun. The territory of this sept lay in the central plains of Ireland, especially in County Meath. The prefix O' indicates male descendant of, whilst "maol", describes a "tonsured one", a follower of a religious order. The original nameholder or chief was called Maoilsheachlann and he was better known as Malachy 11nd, the High King of Ireland from 980 a.d. to 1002. The second sept belonged to Innishowen in County Donegal. Here the name meant the "son of Lochlann", the latter being a Norse-Viking pre 7th century compound of the elements "loch", meaning a lake or fjord, plus "lann", land. The great leading men of this sept are frequently referred to in "The Annals of the Four Masters". Among the many recordings in Ireland is the marriage of John McLaughlin and Elizabeth Crauffurd on June 23rd 1666 at Derry Cathedral, Templemore. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Teag MacLochlann of Ulster. This was dated 1199, in the Annals of Medieval History for the counties of Donegal and Derry, during the reign of King Cathal, known as Red Hand. He was the High King of Ireland from 1198 to 1224. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Margaretfinch

Margaretfinch Report 14 May 2009 08:19

I would not have thought that BUTLER was an Irish name but my OH gg/grandfather came from Ireland although no clue where as on the census it just says born in Ireland thank you
Margaret

SpanishEyes

SpanishEyes Report 3 Aug 2009 07:45

I think I should say " Mea Culpa" to Ann of Green Gables.!!!

I have just remembered this site and trawling through it I have found meanings of name s that I had asked for sometime ago.

I have now book marked it.
New surname

Rush

Thanks


Bridget

Mavis

Mavis Report 8 Oct 2009 18:32

Thanks so much for the offer!

My Irish Surnames are:-

Fallon
Power
Troy
Cullam

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 18:37

Fallon


This interesting name has two possible origin, the first being that it is a variant of the English name "Fuller", from the Old English pre 7th Century "fullere", a name given to "a dresser of cloth". The second possible origin is Irish, from the Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O' Fallamhain", a descendant of Fallamhan, which was a byname meaning "leader", from "follamhnas, supremacy. Fuller is first recorded in 1219 (Assize Rolls, Yorkshire) as Roger Fulur, and Fallon, although a common name in Ireland, was not recorded there until 1585 (Dysart, Athlone, County Roscommon). The surname can be found as Fallon, O' Fallon, O' Fallo(w)ne, Fal(l)oon and Fallen, and can also be found as Hallon, from the Gaelic O' Fhallamhain. In Ireland the name is mainly found in Counties Galway and Roscommon. Among the sample recordings in London are the marriage of Peter Fallon and Magdalen Hebert on October 28th 1704 at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster and the christening of William, son of James and Elizabeth Fallon on June 2nd 1839 at St. Luke's, Chelsea. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Anne Fallen (christening), which was dated March 14th 1565, St. Giles Cripplegate, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 18:38

Troy


This is a very interesting locational surname. It is of French origins. Recorded in several forms including Troy, Troye, Troyes and Troys, it is from the city of Troyes in France. It was probably introduced into England at the time or shortly after the famous Conquest of 1066, although the first recording we have is not until the Hundred Rolls of 1273, two centuries later. This can probably be explained by missing records, although it is also true to say that for at least the first three centuries after the Conquest, there was regular passage of soldiers and merchants in particular, between the countries. This cross border activity was increased regularly because the kings of England, also laid claim to being the kings of France. Some such as the famous King Henry Vth, took considerable time out to prove their point, holding large areas of France under their sovereignty. The first known recording is probably that of Jacobus de Troye who appears in the rolls for the city of London in 1273. He is also recorded as James de Troys, and this is one of the earliest examples of the use of 'James' as a personal name. The surname has always been quite well recorded in the city of London. Examples from the Napoleonic Period include William Troy who married Eleanor Fitzgerald at St Georges Chapel, Hanover Square, Westminster, in 1793, and a few years later in 1809, that of John Troy who married Maria Moore at the same church. The name is perhaps more popular in the United States, and particularly so in the city of Boston.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 18:38

Power


This interesting surname has two distinct possible origins, each with its own history and derivation. Firstly, the name may be locational from the Old French "Pohier", indicating a native of Pois, a town in Picardy, North France, so called from the Old French "pois", fish, because of its well-stocked rivers. Locational surnames were originally given to the lord of the manor, or as a means of identification to those who left their place of origin to settle elsewhere. The surname from this source was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It entered Ireland in 1170 when a bearer of the name le Poer took part in Strongbow's invasion of Wexford. The name, initially Gaelicized "de Paor", and later Anglicized "Power", became one of the most completely Hibernicized of the surnames introduced at the time of the Anglo-Norman invasion. Poore may also have originated as a nickname for a poor man, or ironically for a miser, from the Middle English and Old French "povre, poure", poor. In the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex, dated 1296 to 1332, the name appears as "le Poer, le Power", and "Power", and Richard le Poor, Poore or Poure (deceased 1237), was successively bishop of Chichester, Salisbury, and Durham. A Coat of Arms granted to the Poore family of Oxfordshire, is a silver shield with three black bars nebulee, over all a gold bend. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Drogo Poher, which was dated 1127, in the "Ancient Charters of Gloucestershire", during the reign of King Henry 1, known as "The Lion of Justice", 1100 - 1135. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 18:39

Fallon


This interesting name has two possible origin, the first being that it is a variant of the English name "Fuller", from the Old English pre 7th Century "fullere", a name given to "a dresser of cloth". The second possible origin is Irish, from the Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O' Fallamhain", a descendant of Fallamhan, which was a byname meaning "leader", from "follamhnas, supremacy. Fuller is first recorded in 1219 (Assize Rolls, Yorkshire) as Roger Fulur, and Fallon, although a common name in Ireland, was not recorded there until 1585 (Dysart, Athlone, County Roscommon). The surname can be found as Fallon, O' Fallon, O' Fallo(w)ne, Fal(l)oon and Fallen, and can also be found as Hallon, from the Gaelic O' Fhallamhain. In Ireland the name is mainly found in Counties Galway and Roscommon. Among the sample recordings in London are the marriage of Peter Fallon and Magdalen Hebert on October 28th 1704 at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster and the christening of William, son of James and Elizabeth Fallon on June 2nd 1839 at St. Luke's, Chelsea. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Anne Fallen (christening), which was dated March 14th 1565, St. Giles Cripplegate, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 18:41

for Margaret Finch

Butler

This famous aristocratic surname is of Norman-French origins, and is one of the very few to be accepted as being pre-1066 in origin and recording, and even rarer still to be recorded in France itself. It is in a sense job descriptive, deriving the Olde French 'bouteillier' and meaning "one who supplies the bottles" but more specifically the wine. However 'Bouteillier'in the surname sense defines status in a royal or at least noble, household, along with the Marshall (Master of the Horse), The Steward (Head of the Estate), The (dis)Spencer (Head of Provisions) and the Bouteillier or Butler (Master of the Pantry). That the original 'Butlers' were much more than servants of any sort is shown by the fact that when Theodore Fitzwalter accompanied King Henry 11 on his conquest of Ireland in 1171, he was not only appointed 'Chief Butler of Ireland' but he subsequently adopted 'Butler' as his surname. In England and Ireland no less than ninety four Coats of Arms have been granted to Boteler and Butler, the first being to Robert de Pincerna, butler to Randolf, Earl of Chester, in 1158, and the first of the Butlers of Cheshire. This original and ancient arms has the blazon of a red field, a bend between three goblets, all gold. The Butler's were also amongst the first into the new American Colonies, Francis Butler, aged 18, being recorded as a settler at 'Elizabeth Cittie, Virginea'in January 1624. He arrived on the ship 'Bonaventure' and was a member of the governors guard, history repeating itself. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugo Buteiller, which was dated 1055, The calendar of preserved ancient documents of France, during the reign of King Henry 1 of France, 1031 - 1060. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 22:08

I'm sure if you look back through we have done those surnames Barbra

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 22:09

Cain

This interesting surname has three possible sources; firstly, it may be of Old French origin, and is either a nickname for a tall, thin man, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who gathered reeds, which were needed in the Middle Ages as a floor covering, and for weaving small baskets, or a topographical name for someone who lived in a damp area overgrown with reeds. It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed. Secondly, it may be a Norman locational name from the town of Caen, in Calvados, Normandy, named with the Gaulish elements "catu", battle, plus "magos" meaning field, plain. Finally, it may be of Welsh origin, deriving from the female given name "Keina", perhaps a short form of such Welsh personal names as "Ceindrych, Ceinwen", from the Welsh "cain" meaning beautiful. The surname dates back to the late 12th Century (see below). London Church Records list the marriage of Michaell Cain to Rebecca Chapell, on February 2nd 1600, at St. Bride's, Fleet Street. A Coat of Arms granted to a Cain family is black, a silver phoenix. The Crest is a demi antelope per fesse blue and silver, gold collared and armed. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Godfrey Kein, which was dated 1198, in the "Abbey of Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk", during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 22:10

Kane


Recorded as Kain, Kane, Kann, and Kayne, this interesting surname is regarded as English, but has several possible origins. Firstly, it may be of Old French origin, either a nickname for a tall, thin man, as some fifteen percent of all surnames are known to come from a nickname source. Secondly it may be an occupational name for a reed weaver or even a reed merchant, one who sold reeds used for thatching, flooring and basket weaving. In both cases the derivation is from the word "cane", meaning reed. Thirdly it may be locational and again French, and describe a former inhabitant of the town of Caen, in Normandy. Meaning "Battlefield", it is named from the "fused" 6th century Gaulish elements "catu" (battle), and "magos", a field. Lastly the name may be of Welsh origin, deriving from the male given name "Cain" or the female "Keina", both meaning "good looking", or perhaps as a short form of other Welsh personal names as Ceindrych or Ceinwen. Early examples of the surname recording in the surviving church registers of the diocese of Greater London include the marriage of Michael Cain to Rebecca Chapell, on February 2nd 1600, at St. Bride's, Fleet Street, and that of Mary Kann, the daughter of Joseph Kann, who was christened at St Benets church, Pauls Wharf, on October 23rd 1692. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Godfrey Kein. This was dated 1198, in the register of the abbey of Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk", during the reign of King Richard 1st, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 22:10

Kennedy

This is an anglicized form of an Olde Gaelic (Scots and Irish) personal/nickname 'cinneidigh or cinneide', a compound of the elements 'cinn' meaning 'head', plus 'eide' translating variously as 'grim' or 'helmeted'. Cinneide was the nephew of Brian Boru, High King of Ireland (1002 - 1014), and the surname O Cinneide (the Gaelic prefix 'O' indicating 'male descendant of') came into being in Ireland in the 11th Century. The 'Annals of the Four Masters' record an O Cinneide, Lord of Tipperary in 1159. The first recorded Scottish name bearer appears to be Gilbert Mac Kenedi who witnessed a charter in Melrose circa 1165 - 1170. (The prefix 'mac' means 'son of'). The Scottish Kennedys are by remote origin Irish Gaels. In 1296 one, Alexander Kennedy was canon of Glasgow. Duncan Kennedy, provost of Aberdeen, 1321 - 1322 was the first recorded of the name in the north east. The Kennedy's held the lands of Kermuck (Aberdeenshire) for generations. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Henry Kennedy or Mac Kenede, which was dated 1185 - Leader of a rebellion in Galloway, during the reign of King William, The Lion of Scotland, 1165 - 1214. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Suzanne

Suzanne Report 8 Oct 2009 22:22

hello,could you please find out the origins of the name meyers or mears,from around the belfast area.thank you x

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 8 Oct 2009 22:24

pretty sure I've done this before too!!

Mears


This interesting surname, of Anglo-Saxon origin, is a topographical name for someone who lived by a pond, deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "mere" meaning "lake, pond", or a topographical name for someone who lived near a boundary, deriving from the Olde English "(ge)moere" meaning "boundary". The surname dates back to the mid 13th Century (see below), and further early recordings include: Gregory de la Mere, listed in the Hundred Rolls of Wiltshire, and Adam del Mere (1307), in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, Yorkshire. Variations in the idiom of the spelling include Meares, Meers, Meres, Meeres and Merris. Recordings from London Church Registers include: the marriage of John Merer and Margarett Francis at St. Margaret Lothbury, on February 30th 1563; the christening of Joan Meares on November 18th 1587, at St. Martin in the Fields, Westminster; and the christening of Lydia, daughter of William and Elizabeth Meares, at St. Sepulchre, on May 10th 1702. One John Mears (1695 - 1767) was an Irish presbyterian divine having studied divinity in Glasgow and received an M.A., in 1713. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert atte Mere, which was dated 1269, witness in the "Assize Court Rolls of Somerset", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

MaryMc

MaryMc Report 10 Oct 2009 03:42

Hi Ann,

if you're still doing this, could you please tell me the meaning of McCorkell?

Thanks so much.

MaryMc

MaryMc

MaryMc Report 11 Oct 2009 05:28

Bumping up :)

Thanks