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IRISH Surnames - Origins etc.

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 21 Feb 2011 10:59


Last name: Flemming
An unusual Old French name, first introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, 'Flamanc' and meaning 'The Fleming' or a 'Man from Flanders'. Flanders was the continental textile manufacturing centre, and in order to 'encourage' English industry, the export of wool to the continent was banned and many 'Flemings' emigrated to England and set up cloth manufacturing, particularly in East Anglia and Yorkshire. Probably the most famous namebearer listed in the national Biography is alexander Fleming (1824 - 1875) a medicar writer whose "Physiological and Medicinal Properties of Aconitum Napellus" (1845) led to the introduction of Fleming's tincture. Another interesting namebearer was a child prodigy who sadly died very young, one Margaret Fleming (1803 - 1811) known as "Pet Marjoie" who played with Sir Walter Scott and composed a poem on Mary Queen of Scots, and other verses. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Le Flamanc, which was dated 1219, The Yorkshire Assizes, during the reign of King Henry 111, 'The Frenchman', 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Flemming#ixzz1EadpPQvW

Nicola

Nicola Report 21 Feb 2011 12:22

Thankyou Ann

Chevaun

Chevaun Report 21 Feb 2011 14:11

Thanks very much Ann, the info is much appreciated.

Chevaun

Chevaun Report 21 Feb 2011 17:37

Just to add, I found the website included in the post very helpful and have looked up many family surnames since - Thanks again.

martynsue

martynsue Report 21 Feb 2011 17:38

hello ann,
just come across this thread,as i have mangan as a g grandmother and from offaly,it was most interesting as i do not have any info on her as she never told the truth on any document's,the only true fact's on her are her birth date and death date.
thank's sue

Joy Kentish Maid

Joy Kentish Maid Report 5 May 2011 17:02

nudged

Frances

Frances Report 5 May 2011 18:32

Hi Teresa,
Thank you for your offer. Please would you look up Gladney.It is an unusual name and they lived in the Wexford. Thank you .
Frances

Stephen

Stephen Report 23 Jun 2011 14:44

Steve& Mary from Cambridge
Hi: Teresa
could you look up surname De Ireland or Ireland
as we think they moved from Ireland to the `Hutt ` Lancashire round the Norman Conquest. hope you can Help Regards: Steve& Mary

Florence

Florence Report 23 Jun 2011 17:19

Hello Teresa or Ann,?

if you do not mind could you look up ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Tierney,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
Patrick was born we think? Mayo Ireland.
we have yet to confirm which part of Ireland as i am doing a favour for a relative.

Flo
,,,p.s. sorry just noticed date ! here,s hoping you are still doing this?

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 17:43


Last name: Tierney
Recorded in several forms as shown below, this is an Irish surname. It derives from the Gaelic O' Tighearnaigh, meaning the grandson or male descendant of Tighearnach, the latter translating as lord or master. Traditionally Irish family names are taken from the heads of tribes, revered elders, or from some illustrious warrior, and are usually prefixed by O' or Mac, denoting "son of". This surname is especially widespread in County Galway, whereas the earliest recording is found in County Limerick in the early 18th Century (see below). In the modern idiom the surname can be found recorded as Tierney, Tierny,Tiernaney, O'Tierney, Tearny, Tearney and Terney. Recordings from various church registers include the christening of James Tierny, on June 4th 1741, at Limerick Cathedral, County Limerick; the christening of Penelope Tierney on April 17th 1754, at St. Olave's, Hart Street, London; and Patrick Tiernaney who left Liverpool bound for New York on the ship Marmion on May 18th 1847. The family coat of arms has the blazon of a silver shield charged with a red chief and overall a black chevron. The crest is an oak tree. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Tierny, which was dated 1735, when he married Ann Young, at Limerick Cathedral, County Limerick. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Tierney#ixzz1Q7OaDfh8

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 17:45


Last name: Mangan
This name, with variant spelling Mongan, is an Anglicized form of the Old Gaelic O Mongain. The Gaelic prefix 'O' indicates 'male descendant of', plus the personal byname 'Mongan' referring to one with a luxurious growth of hair (from 'mong', long-haired, plus the diminutive suffix 'ain'). Three branches of this sept existed in ancient Ireland. The Ulster sept which gave its name to the parish of Termonomongan in County Tyrone is no longer numerous. The Munster Mangans, orginally belonging to Counties Cork and Tipperary, now have a wider distribution in County Limerick. The territory of the third sept lay in North Connacht where the name was phonetically Anglicized as Mongan. To-day, however the form Mangan is more prevalent in all areas. James Clarence Mangan (1803 - 1849), born in Shanagolden, County Limerick, was a poet of renown and contributer to the 'Nation' and 'United Irishman' journals. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Mangan, (the name borne by twelve families), which was dated 1665, 'The Hearth Money Rolls for County Tipperary', during the reign of King Charles 11 of England, 'The Merry Monarch', 1160 - 1185. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Mangan#ixzz1Q7P291o3

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 17:46


Last name: Ireland
Recorded as Irish, Ireland and the rare dialectal Ierland, this surname can best be described as English but of Irish origins! In ancient times it was an ethnic name for an immigrant from Ireland or possibly Scotland or the Isle of Man, the derivation being from the Olde English pre 7th century word "Iraland", so called from the genitive case of "Iras", meaning Irishman, and "land", territory. Early examples of the surname include: William le Hyreis of the county of Suffolk in 1227, Robert de Irlonde in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex for 1327, and Robert le Irish in the Assize Court rolls of Staffordshire in 1356. As Ierland the greatest concentration of later recordings is in the county of Lancashire perhaps commencing with John Ierland of Barwick on October 13th 1623. The surname was widely recorded in the Poll Tax Returns of the county of Yorkshire in 1379, whilst a later entry was that of Samuell Ireland, aged 32. He was an early emigrant to the new English colonies of America, and together with his wife, Marie, and daughter, Martha, he embarked from the port of London on the aptly named ship "Increase," bound for Virgina in April 1635. Bearers of the name resident in Ireland descended from early emigrants from Ireland, who then in the course of time, returned to the land of their forefathers. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Ireis of Shropshire, in the pipe rolls of that English county in the year 1169. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Ireland#ixzz1Q7PKbQe0

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 17:47

nothing for Mangan I'm afraid

GinaS

GinaS Report 23 Jun 2011 19:30

Hi,

Brocken - from Athy

Casserly

Splane

Many thanks GinaS

Florence

Florence Report 23 Jun 2011 20:02

Thank you Ann.!

Thats a lot of help and interestingly Patrick,s father is name John Tierney!
also the name Ann! is in the family tree so we know where to look !

by the way Ann is it possible you could e,mail the info save me printing the whole page? want to show my rellie this he will be pleased.

i am most grateful for your time !

Flo

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 20:29

send me your email addy Florence and I'll send it

Ann

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 20:35

nothing for Brocken I'm afraid





Last name: Casserley
This is an anglicization of the Gaelic name O Caiside - a compound of the elements "O" meaning "grandson" or "male descendant" and the personal name Caiside (coming from "cas" - curly hair). The O'Cassidys belonged to County Fermanagh in the province of Ulster and they provided physicians to the Maguires (a name which means pale-coloured!) between 1300 and 1600. The (O)Cassidys also excelled in the field of literature. One Rory O'Cassidy, Archdeacon of Clogher, is said to have helped compile the 15th century "Annals of Ulster". In the modern idiom the name is also spelt with an initial "k" The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Giolla Moduda O'Cassidy (Gaelic poet) which was dated 1143, during the reign of King Stephen, known as "The Count de Blois" 1135 - 1154. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Casserley#ixzz1Q85oatwA

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 20:36

nothing for Splane either but I would imagine it's derived from Spillane

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 23 Jun 2011 20:37

Spillane as I thought!!!



Last name: Spillane
Recorded in several forms as shown below, this world famous surname is Irish. In past times the Gaelic spelling was O' Spealain, and it is said to be of dual origins, in that the clan was recorded as holding lands in at least two places. In medieval times one branch of the clan held the barony of Eliogarthy in County Tipperary, whilst the other was recorded from the year 1540 at Bective, in County Meath. Curiously the place names of Ballyspelane occur in both County Kilkenny and County Tipperary, suggesting that in long off times, the influence of the clan was very wide indeed. The meaning of the surname is the descendant of the scythe, from the ancient gaelic word "speal" meaning scythe or possibly sword, suggesting that the first nameholder was a warrior chief. In the modern idiom the name is recorded as the very rare O' Spillane, but more usually Spillane, and sometimes Splain, Splane, Spollen and Spelman. The latter is an 18th century development associated with the province of Connacht. Early examples of the surname recording include Timothy Splane who married Ellen Fowlue at Killarney, County Kerry, in 1795, as well as Michael Spillane. He emigrated to New York from the port of Cork in 1847, being formerly a small farmer from County Offaly. He was the grandfather of the famous author Mickey Spillane, whilst Cardinal Spelman (1889 - 1969) was the Archbishop of New York for many years. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Spillane#ixzz1Q86J71N6

ElizabethK

ElizabethK Report 24 Jun 2011 10:05

Hello Ann

FARRELL(E)Y

Armagh I think !