Genealogy Chat

Top tip - using the Genes Reunited community

Welcome to the Genes Reunited community boards!

  • The Genes Reunited community is made up of millions of people with similar interests. Discover your family history and make life long friends along the way.
  • You will find a close knit but welcoming group of keen genealogists all prepared to offer advice and help to new members.
  • And it's not all serious business. The boards are often a place to relax and be entertained by all kinds of subjects.
  • The Genes community will go out of their way to help you, so don’t be shy about asking for help.

Quick Search

Single word search

Genes Extras

Genes Reunited subscription bonuses

As a way of saying thank you to our subscribers, we have launched Genes Extras. You'll find exclusive competitions and discounts on family history magazines, days out and much more.

Take me to Genes Extras

Icons

  • New posts
  • No new posts
  • Thread closed
  • Stickied, new posts
  • Stickied, no new posts

Female convicts to Australia - children?

ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

۞ Cherilyn ۞

۞ Cherilyn ۞ Report 2 Jan 2013 07:49

Does anyone know if female convicts were allowed to bring very young children with them when they were transported? Or, if they were born on the journey, if they would be allowed to keep them?

Thank you!

Gai

Gai Report 2 Jan 2013 09:18

Hi Cherilyn,

I found this website which is very interesting to read.


http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/res-10.html

Andysmum

Andysmum Report 2 Jan 2013 12:17

A fascinating site. Almost makes me wish I had some convict ancestors!!

BeverleyW

BeverleyW Report 2 Jan 2013 12:18

Also
http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/confem.html

"Quite a few married women were transported with their children and some shipping entries record their husbands' names as well. Divorce was not available to the common person until the late 1800s and was expensive and scandalous. Previously married convicts were permitted to remarry after seven years' separation as long as their spouse was abroad, even if they were still living."

۞ Cherilyn ۞

۞ Cherilyn ۞ Report 3 Jan 2013 01:46

Thanks, very interesting!

The one in hubby's tree was single when she arrived in NSW in 1828 but her convict record states she had one child. She did marry (1830) and my theory is that their eldest child (listed on death certs) was her child, as his age works out that he was born c1828. :-) (Though this is strongly disputed by that son's direct descendants, for obvious reasons!)

Might check if the NSW records have any info on the female factory inmates...!

۞ Cherilyn ۞

۞ Cherilyn ۞ Report 3 Jan 2013 02:12

Can't find early record of the FF on the NSW records site so have sent off a request. Fingers crossed!