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Accents and dialects

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 18:27

I love how diverse our accents are and how different our dialects are. Although, it is sometimes difficult to understand what people are saying its still great to hear their natural tongues. I am usually having to crane my ear to understand others, but people seem to find my accent clear enough for me to understood. Words are very important to the English language which words do you feel are used in your dialect but maybe not in others? and do they mean something different in other areas? or do you seem (like me) to have a language within a language which is recognised automatically?

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 6 Feb 2013 18:34

"Am yow gooing up t'oss rud to get suck for babby, owd cock?"

"Are you going along the main road to buy some sweeties for our toddler, old chap?"

(the first example is Chaucerian English as still practised in Lower Gornal near Dudley, the second example is modern West Midlands dialect as practised by Paula+ and others local to area) :-D

Sharron

Sharron Report 6 Feb 2013 18:36

Cat come skittering down the twitten with a dishwasher in he's mouth he had caught somewhen before.

Went skitterways across the garden ,stopped for a firk and the dishwasher got away.

He did it once before with a basketman.

David

David Report 6 Feb 2013 18:36


The Geordie accent on Tyneside is almost foreign to many.

Yet just a few miles away from Newcastle the accent varies at Bedlington or Blyth or Ashington.

Happily we all understand one another.

Sharron

Sharron Report 6 Feb 2013 18:40

I read once about the police taking in a foreign lorry driver who was very,very drunk,

They could not work out the language in which he was speaking andneither could an interpreter so they left him in a cell to sleep it off.

When he woke up it turned out that he was a geordie.

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 18:44

strangely, I understood both of the Dudley/Gornal quotes my accent is in the middle of both.

going is goowin' and road is roerd,

but I am surprised that Paula is living nr Gornal with such a posh accent the accent won't last long there or to translate

'yow wo be spakin loike it fower long'

Sharron it sounds great where is it from?

David I love the Geordie accent - I was once asked to translate a phone conversation with a Dudley lady - I understood the Geordie better

Sharron

Sharron Report 6 Feb 2013 18:48

Sussex. My grandparents were particularly old so I talk a bit broader than many now.

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 6 Feb 2013 18:49

Footie Angel

There are places less than 6 miles from Lower Gornal where the Queen would sound common. And in any case, that posh wench Sue Lawley was brought up in Gornal ;-)

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 18:51

Awww lovely. Im getting a bit of an Essex accent so I sound broader than ever. My Grandad had a very broad accent and even we had no idea of some of the words in his dialect but I know a lady who could translate.

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 18:56

If you wanna find a "real Black Country Mon" then Gornal's your place. Sue Lawley was just one of ar famous children. I'm proud to be a BC wench me I will never forget me roots. You may be hinting at T'pon or indeed Raerlay but I'm not convinced take a look at my pic that may well have the worst accent or maybe its somewhere in Wolves like Ettinshall or Bills mothers or ova Walsall like Leamore or Bloxwich.

Oh I missed out Quarry Bonk.

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 6 Feb 2013 18:57

I spoke to someone today about my Sky contract called Gareth. The line crackled a lot and he had a very noticeable Indian accent :-S

David

David Report 6 Feb 2013 18:59


Whae yi knaa warra mean,am Geordie wi an Irish Dah

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 19:01

Lol David nice to meet you

Dermot

Dermot Report 6 Feb 2013 19:09

Sadly, the last known speaker of the Cromity dialect in Scotland died not too long ago.

But let's hear it now for the Brythonic languages.

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 19:12

sad when these things die out

♥†۩ Carol   Paine ۩†♥

♥†۩ Carol Paine ۩†♥ Report 6 Feb 2013 19:17

I have a tape of my Father & his sister talking about a 19th Century drawing of the village church, the fact that there was a window in the roof & a door where the old family pew was.

Any older members might remember Walter Gabriel ... well he had nothing on my Dad & Aunt with their Sussex drawl. :-D

Sharron

Sharron Report 6 Feb 2013 19:35

Where were they from Carol? Do ee say somewhen?

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 19:38

I imagine yu to be quite posh Carol x

♥†۩ Carol   Paine ۩†♥

♥†۩ Carol Paine ۩†♥ Report 6 Feb 2013 20:36

Both born at a Farm on the Kent/Sussex boarder, beginning of 1900's.


Nothing posh about me, got Kent/Sussex soil in my veins... well my ancestors have dug most of it :-D :-D

sumwen

:-D

FootieAngel

FootieAngel Report 6 Feb 2013 20:41

Lol like me theres a saying "Yow con tek the wench aret the Wrenna bu neva the Wrenna aret the wench"