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Work Stress

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

Purple **^*Sparkly*^** Diamond

Purple **^*Sparkly*^** Diamond Report 22 Jun 2013 07:41

http://www.mind.org.uk/employment

Have a look at the above site Annie, there might be things on there to help and you could get advice as well.

Have been thinking about you, glad you are able to show your work as your own now and not have it hijacked by that stupid woman. Take photos of you working at home so they can see you aren't exaggerating.

Good luck

Lizxx

Lyndi

Lyndi Report 21 Jun 2013 23:10


I remember that feeling well, and one day I went home from work and thought 'I just can't do this any more', so I didn't,
I posted in my resignation, followed swiftly by a certificate from my gp.
It took me six months to feel really well again, but I have not looked back.
I know I was fortunate that I was old enough to take my pension and didn't need to work, and that many don't have this option.
Take good care of yourselves Annie and Suzanne. xx

ann

ann Report 21 Jun 2013 22:52

I know that feeling Suzanne and I think its happening in a lot of work places. now. Mine is just a lazy senior that never turns up. I have learnt now when I do her work I e-mail it to my manager before I e-mail her. I was sending my work to her and she was sending it to the manager in her name. She is that lazy she once asked me to do myself a one to one and she would sign it lol. All the training courses online for our company she asks me to do as her grade is too low???? I have not done the last few as we have to use a camera on computer when we are doing it now. But I do find this is all stress. I have been back to work for 3 days and bought work home as she loaded me up with so much. Cant wait now for meeting with head office. Look after your self Suzanne xx

Suzanne

Suzanne Report 21 Jun 2013 21:55

im having the same problem in the NHS,

ive not gone of work sick,but if it carries on it will effect my health,

in the 12yrs ive worked within the NHS ive only had 5 days off sick,but now im at the stage where my hearts in my mouth as i walk through the doors. :-(

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 21 Jun 2013 18:01

I was thinking same when it was said that a doctor's note kept you off work.

I know my company interviews you at home regularly and, if it gets too long, you get sent to company doctor and put under "occupational health". Doctor's papers mean very little if it goes beyond a few days.

Stress is a constant pressure at work - it seems to increase significantly every year in most jobs. But also, the pressure to get everybody back to work and reduce paid absenteeism is top priority with a lot of firms.

Have had a couple of interviews with "the management" in 10 years I have done current job. Usually about performance slipping. And I have been nervous as a kitten because I needed the wage and expected I might be given the push. But meetings have always been much more positive and businesslike than I expected and I have been able to agree an "action plan for improvement" :-)

Hopefully, Annie will feel happier after this meeting. I do hope so.

Shirley~I,m getting the hang of it

Shirley~I,m getting the hang of it Report 21 Jun 2013 17:51

when our daughter got diagnosed with non Hodgkins \Lymphoma she was at stage 3 .

She was working at P&O at Dover. She said they dint have a good reputation as far as she knew for long term sick.

She hadl 6 months chemo every two weeks that laid her very low in between she had the local nursing service coming in do bloods tests etc.we went down every two week to take e her for her chemo and the following week I went down to help when the chemo kicked in.

It wasnt a nice period and she has been left with peripheral; nerve damage to her hands and feet.

After the six months were over she had to have blood test etc and monitoring for five years till they would say cured .


Well her employer got shirty even tho her doc was signing her off every month. She was told you have to see the company doc and HE will say if you are fit for work. She wasn't as still very tired on a daily basis .

The Company Doc said you can work!! so if she didn't go back she lost her job. She started part time but for only two weeks th n was expected to go full time /

They needed the money so she did but it was very hard on her .

Even now some 5 years later she is still feeling the effects of her illness and chemo

SueCar

SueCar Report 21 Jun 2013 17:24

How are you today, GrannieAnnie? x

wisechild

wisechild Report 19 Jun 2013 15:04

If your GP signs you off as unfit for work it´s illegal for your employer to force you back...especially with threats. Nor are you legally able to decide for yourself that you will go back until you are certified as fit.
That´s why GPs have to give sick notes when they consider that someone is unfit for work.

DIZZI

DIZZI Report 19 Jun 2013 08:34

IF YOUR OWN GP SIGNS YOU OFF WITH STRESS,
YOUR MANAGMENT ARE NOT ALLOWED TO CONTACT YOU
DUE TO ADDING MORE STRESS

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 19 Jun 2013 08:21

Seems like a lot of us have been in position you are in, Annie. I was very impressed with advice over night. All very good, and TBK's was excellent imo.

I do think we need to try and empathise with the bosses a bit. I know how much I used to hate (as a boss in supermarkets) someone coming to a grievance or disciplinary meeting with a solicitor or union rep as it meant I had to play everything by the book and there was no easy way to resolve the issue and it then became a very formal process with no easy way of mending the rift between the employee and the supervisor and you had to try and support supervisor's actions. I know that remark will be picked on, but you had to support supervisor and allow the employee to go or be worked out. Then try and manage the confidence and skills (and inevitably increased work load) of supervisor afterwards. So a lose-lose all round often.

So I think taking your daughter might be a very good move for this meeting. It sounds like a formal meeting as part of fact finding whilst they decide with you a plan of action. The worst that can happen is a very general first written warning about your general conduct, performance etc and a specific plan of improvement action. And all you therefore need is someone you know well who can put a hand on your wrist when you should speak and when you should shut up.

Union/ACAS would be advisable if it goes to next stage. And, yes, write absolutely everything down. :-)

Purple **^*Sparkly*^** Diamond

Purple **^*Sparkly*^** Diamond Report 19 Jun 2013 05:21

Annie, you have carried that useless manager for years now, don't let her ruin your life. Use a friend's computer to type out your more specific notice to the new manager or write it out in longhand, and get someone to type it up for you. Explain why it is in longhand if necessary, say you don't have privacy on the work computer. You have been pushed around enough, stand up now and if you think you are likely to lose your job, you have nothing to lose by naming and shaming that lazy b***h who has caused you so much hassle.

Best of luck,
sorry I haven't been in touch, have a lot going on here right now

Lizxx

Nolls from Harrogate

Nolls from Harrogate Report 19 Jun 2013 04:18

Annie as you've been told above write everything down, word for word if you can and your answers and most importantly the date this can show if your being hassled on a daily basis which is definitely not acceptable. If you query anything do it by email so you have a copy in fact try and answer as much as you can by email putting in what has been said to you eg you say that stress is caused by.... but you don't mention the extra work which you put on to our shoulders...etc... and take copies home with you . Get in touch with the above bodies or a solicitor and if necessary take them to a tribunal. We had a similar case(s) where I worked the manager was a bully and didn't like anyone over 40 he was from a firm which had bought out the firm I worked for and made everyone's life a misery one after another the staff over 40 were kicked out but one lady wrote to the owner of the firm and immediately he was on that phone to the B***** manager telling him to re-instate her as he wanted no tribunal case ..big row ... of course she would not go back and guess what the B****** manager phoned her near in tears asking her "How could she do that to him" ...unbelievable A lot more to this story but not applicable here. Good Luck

TheBlackKnight

TheBlackKnight Report 19 Jun 2013 02:18

Annie your boss is only interested in getting the work load done but does not care how it is done. That is his/her one big error, but don’t worry you can correct him/her on it soon enough.
He/She clearly does not care about his workers like you. He/She has a duty of care & responsibility towards you while you are at his place of work working for him/her. You have rights while in employment.
You say you have a meeting with the boss to attend soon, rather than take your daughter you might do well to take an independent professional person with you, Citizens Advice Bureau is often good for that.
Let them know you can do the Job that you are employed to do, & do very very well, you can even do some of the extra things that have been asked of you but with the amount of extra things that have been thrown on top it is just to much for anybody now. You can even ask for a time & motion inspection to be carried out in your building to prove it. Just a thought.
Take a note from your own doctor saying what it was you was suffering from & how long for.

Hope this helps, good luck

eRRolSheep

eRRolSheep Report 19 Jun 2013 00:59

Annie I hope my PM is of genuine help

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 19 Jun 2013 00:44

Point I was making is that the responsibility for getting the work done is the bosses. Employees can only do their best. Many bosses (particularly in local government) are under the type of pressure to manage scarce resources they have never experienced before.

And they will not be able to recruit and train somebody up quickly to replace Annie. In current climate, they may not be able to recruit a replacement at all. Meanwhile the work has to be done.

So Annie holds a lot more cards than she thinks. Lot of good advice here on this thread, I think. Most of us have probably been in a similar place. And usually it gets resolved to the benefit of everyone. Let's all hope so, in this case.

Eeyore13

Eeyore13 Report 19 Jun 2013 00:24

Phone UNISON 0845 355 0845 & tell them exactly what's happening.

Yes the work has to be done John but the worker- Annie has rights & one of them is not being bullied.If the boss is under pressure it's their own fault for letting the situation escalate to the point that Annie is unable to work.

Good Luck Annie

eRRolSheep

eRRolSheep Report 19 Jun 2013 00:23

I don't think anyone was debating where the actual comment came from.
Comments like "the work has to be done" can, in themselves, cause pressure when coming from the "bosses".
However, I am sure that it is counterproductive to discuss Annie personally on a public board.

Annie, I sincerely hope (and know) that things will turn around for you soon. I don't know your personal situation but hopefully you have a good support network of genuine friends and family. They can truly be the greatest "elixir".

maggiewinchester

maggiewinchester Report 19 Jun 2013 00:22

Annie, you mention work-related stress to a 'superior' - and they'll try to blame anything/everything else!!
Five of us at work are doing twice the work the previous team of 5 were doing. Every year we have an IPP - personal plan for the year - what courses et we wat to do. For 3 years I said I wanted to go on the courses we administer, for 3 years, my line manager wrote 'unable to because of workload' - but nothing was done, more work loaded on to us.
Last year I had had enough, and was off work for 3 weeks. Went back with a typed out explanation, reasons and various reasons why the workoad was made more difficult - mainly the officers above us demanding stuff at the last minute, and basically not knowing their jobs!!
I had also been having tests for strange physical problems I had - finally was diagnosed with diverticular disease - which got worse when I was stressed!!
The rest of the team were asked if they were stressed - they were, but only 2 admitted it.
One was then off with stress - but she admitted she was having relationship problems - but which came first - and she also suffered with depression, so this was blamed as the cause of her stress.

They tried the same thing with me - blaming my home life. I pointed out that I have lived alone for 15 years, have (fortunatley) never suffered from depression - until then - and, quite frankly, one of my cats bringing in a dead mouse doesn't stress me out, but work overload, previously admitted by my manager did.
I've had stage 1 'capability' procedure - took a union rep with me, he was useless.

After stage 1 I was sent to Occupational Health. Their suggestion was to take extra strong painkillers - presumably to pretend I didn't have any infection/pain and stagger in to work. I knew I shouldn't, but tried it. I slurred my speech, concentration was zilch and ended up off work for another 3 weeks, as I had an infection!!

Problem with Diverticular disease, is, even when the stress goes, the gut is very sensitive. I staggered into work in pain for a week in May, then found out I had a kidney infection in my (one) kidney.
Went off sick and took antibiotics. Pain persisted - kidney infection had gone - but I had diverticulitis!! More antibiotics, another week off work.
Capability stage 2 looms. I look upon it as a challenge now.
All my ill health has been caused by work - but work blames me!!
In a way, having a physical reaction to stress makes it much more difficult for them. They're trying to insist the Diverticulitis isn't caused by stress, but as no-one knows what causes it, they're on sticky ground, and my doctor insists, in my case, that it is caused by workload stress (bless his cotton socks :-D)

Quite frankly, my health is worth more than the peanuts I get in pay.

When I leave Hampshire County Council, I shall write a leaflet, explaining how you can apply for one job, be made redundant/unfairly dismissed because they decide to move the office into the New Forest - and I don't drive - be unable to re-employ you - but can employ you for a year as a temp.
Then you can get another job with them as a finance assistant, be bullied, the bully retains their position, but you are downgraded, complete with loss of pay, so your take-home pay is less than when you first started, to a job you never wanted, but can teach everyone else - including the business manager how to use the finance system (as well as doing your 'own' work), suffer ill health because of this, an then have them claim you can't do your job!!!
Latest wheeze is to make our grade, and those below us 'apprentice' grades!"
Work for Hampshire County Council and work your way down the system

:-\

Annie, you're not alone. Write everything down - do it on a word document, save it to 'personal' and add it as an attachment to an e-mail to higher management. Don't let the Bustards grind you down. It's not easy on you own - I know, I was on my own when I was being bullied, but a daily 'diary' - preferably done on a word document - explaining how you feel etc can give them a nasty shock.
In writing - it's evidence.

JustJohn

JustJohn Report 19 Jun 2013 00:12

It was the doctor who mentioned assertiveness course. It is often the boss who has low self-esteem and feels insecure. I get the impression that Annie knows exactly how useful her skills are in her employment. And how hard and effectively she can work.

I think the doctor has a point personally. Assertiveness courses can help with "managing your boss" and - heavens knows - some bosses need managing these days. The boss will be under immense pressure, I would think, if Annie cannot return soon. The work has to be done.

eRRolSheep

eRRolSheep Report 19 Jun 2013 00:03

Assertiveness courses, although often good in their own right (even though some are run by so called experts who have not got an actual clue and are only running the courses because they cannot actually function properly in the workplace themselves) are not necessarily the immediate answer. When one has perceived low self esteem, exacerbated by the way that the company has handled events and situations in the run-up and ensuing time, the last thing on one's mind is attending a course. That may come in time.