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IRISH Surnames - Origins etc.

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 22:12

Comer Name Meaning and History
English: occupational name from Middle English combere, an agent derivative of Old English camb ‘comb’, referring perhaps to a maker or seller of combs, or to someone who used them to prepare wool or flax for spinning. This was an alternative process to carding, and caused the wool fibers to lie more or less parallel to one another, so that the cloth produced had a hard, smooth finish without a nap.
English: variant of Coomber.
Probably an Americanized spelling of German Kommer or Kammer.

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins Report 14 Jan 2009 22:13

Joy


Mc CUSKER, Mac Oscar, Cusker, Cosker

Keatings history of Ireland (v.3) gives McCusker as on of the chief clans of Monaghan, citing them as MacCuskers or Mac Oscars sometimes changed to Cosgraves, who possessed a dist of Monaghan, near Carrickmacross, adjacent to county Louth.
They are also cited as a branch of Mac Guires in Fermanagh.

McCusker is used as a synonym of Cosgrave in Oriel and Cusker & Cosker are found in Wexford.

The 1890 birth index lists the name as located in Co Tyrone. In Milesian families the name is given as one of Scottish heritage, settling in Antrim in 1660.
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McALARNEY…nothing found only these:

Mac Aleary…. is traditionally linked to Counties, Sligo and Antrim.

Mac Aleavey…..Centered in Down and Armagh in the 19th century.
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BROPHY…….. The name is said to have come from O’Broithe, originally from Co. Leix (Queens County). The name is found most often in Dublin, Kilkenny, Queens & Tipperary in the 1890 birth index.

In more recent times, the name can be found in Co. Carlow too.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 22:14

Herra

http://ifhf.brsgenealogy.com/surnames.php?surname=HERRA

Irish Genealogy records for the surname HERRA in Ireland


The following number of records match you query. Select the View button against each database to see the results.

Free Index AccessList of databases that are searchable No. of
Records
Birth Records for Ireland 958
Marriage Records for Ireland 625
Death Records for Ireland 205
Census Records for Ireland 182

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 22:15

hope you didn't mind me sticking my big nose in your thread Teresa

mariescott64

mariescott64 Report 14 Jan 2009 22:28

HI
have you anything on Shirlow?

Thanks
marie

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins Report 14 Jan 2009 22:42

Not at all Ann...

anything to help others searching for the Irish!

Teresa

Joy Kentish Maid

Joy Kentish Maid Report 14 Jan 2009 22:42

Thank you very much.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:01


found this on Ancestry

John Barry Shirlow (View posts) Posted: 16 Jan 2003 7:12AM GMT

Classification: Query
Surnames: shirlow
My Father Stanley Shirlow was born in Lambeg near Lisburn Ulster. Stanley was one of six brothers that all seem to have left Ireland. Stanley eventually settling in Rhodesia. He had two children myself an my sister Maureen, now Willoughby who lives in Wiltshire England. Anyone know where my fathers other brothers went to? I have two sons, Richard and Colin both who also live in S.Africa.
Reply Report

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:02

Surnames of genealogy records for Ireland - (Births, Deaths ...
List of Irish Genealogy Surnames that can be found in Ireland. Click on your desired surname to see the number of occurences within these databases. ...

ifhf.brsgenealogy.com/surnames.php?letter=SHI - 60k - Similar pages

http://ifhf.brsgenealogy.com/surnames.php?letter=SHI

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:06

National Archives
House Number, Surnames in House, Details ... 11, Shirlow, View occupants or original census form (as a PDF). 12, Baird, View occupants or original census ...

www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Antrim... - 7k - Similar pages

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Antrim/Corkey/Lislaban/



Residents of house number 11 in Lislaban (Corkey, Antrim)
Surname Forename Age Sex
McLaughlin James 54 Male
McLaughlin Margaret 51 Female
McLaughlin James 25 Male
McLaughlin Archd 24 Male
McLaughlin Jeannie 21 Female
McLaughlin Annie 17 Female
Shirlow Mary Jane 74 Female

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:10

Surname: Fagan
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, but the source is uncertain. The Gaelic form is "O' Faodhagain", but a personal name Faodghagan is not known, and it may be a Gaelicized version of a surname of Norman origin. A number of Irish bearers of this name are descended from Patrick Fagan, who owned estates in County Meath in the 13th Century. According to tradition, his name was originally O' Hagan and he assumed the name Fagan at the command of King John, for reasons which are unclear. For many Centuries the surname has been associated with Counties Dublin and Meath; a branch of the family was also found in Kerry and another in Cork city, where Christopher Fagan took refuge in 1497. He had been a supporter of Perkin Warbeck's claim to the throne, and Cork was solidly behind that pretender. Among the recordings in Ireland are the christenings of James Fagan on December 17th 1670 at St. Peter and St. Kevin, Dublin and of John, son of John and Sarah Fagan on December 16th 1684 at St. Michan, Dublin. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Fagan, which was dated 1200, Dublin City, Ireland, during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
© Copyright: Name Orgin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2007

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:11

Penston

Wexford Graveyards ©Jane Lyons
Surname & Name. Penston Andrew Penston George Penston Honora Penston James Penston John Penston Judeth Penston Julia Penston Kate Penston Mary Margaret ...

www.from-ireland.net/graves/wex/kilcavan.htm - 21k - Similar pages

http://www.from-ireland.net/graves/wex/kilcavan.htm

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:12


NEW FROM AMAZON.COM: The Penston Name in History ($) provides a collection of facts, figures and other information on your last name. An excellent gift idea for birthdays, family reunions, mother's day, father's day, and more!



AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:13

Irish Genealogy records for the surname PENSTONE in Ireland


The following number of records match you query. Select the View button against each database to see the results.

Free Index AccessList of databases that are searchable No. of
Records
Birth Records for Ireland 48
Marriage Records for Ireland 6
Death Records for Ireland 17
Census Records for Ireland 10
Griffith's Valuation for Ireland 2

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins Report 14 Jan 2009 23:14

Marcie……

KEEGAN
Egan, Eagen, Eagen, MacEgan, MacKeegar.
The name of KEEGAN can be linked to the midlands of Ireland most often.

The 1890 birth index finds the family most numerous in Counties: Dublin, Roscommon, Wicklow and Leintrim.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:14

for Price, without googling this is Welsh for sure - Ap Rhys, or Preece

Ap Rhys - son of Rhys

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:15



FLAHERTY SURNAME HISTORY

The surname Flaherty is numerous in Ireland appearing is some numbers in several counties. Its highest concentration however is in its native county of Galway. The surname is also found in large numbers in the northern counties where the local dialect dropped the initial 'F' thus producing the form Ó Laverty and Ó Laherty.

The name has its origins in Gaelic Ireland where it derives from the Irish 'Ó Flaithbheartaigh' meaning 'bright ruler'.

Griffith's Valuation, a comprehensive listing of those who rented land/property throughout Ireland in the 1850s, records a total of 886 entries for the name Flaherty. Of these 357 were found in County Galway, 141 in county Kerry and lesser numbers in counties Clare, Tipperary, Roscommon and Waterford.

This high concentration of the name in the counties of the western coastline accurately indicates the origins of the family. The O Flahertys were originally located on the east side of Lough Corrib until the Anglo-Norman invasion forced them further west. They established themselves in the territory which included the area between Killary Harbour and Galway Bay and extended to the Aran Islands.

The O Flahertys built their castle at Moycullen and the chief of the family was known as Lord of Moycullen and Lord of Iar (west) Connacht. The relative isolation on the west coast ensured the survival of the chieftaincy until the end of the eighteenth century. The famed historian Roderic (Rory) Ó Flaherty was the last Chief of the Name.

The Inscription over the Gates of Galway, "the ferocious O Flahertys from whom God defend us" indicates something of the colourful nature of the family's history. They were involved in constant warfare with the neighbouring septs of Burkes, O Malleys and the other tribes of Galway.

The minor Donegal sept of Laverty was headed by the Lord of Aileach (Elagh).

Nowadays the name continues to be concentrated in these counties.

As with many Irish surnames several variations have arisen the chief of which are; Flaherty, O'Flaherty, Flahertie, Flagherty.

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins

Teresa With Irish Blood in Me Veins Report 14 Jan 2009 23:16

Leanne…..

FAGAN……..Norman origins (O’Faodhagain)
Fegan, Hagan, Feehan, Fagin, Feagan.

The families of Fegan etc are traditionally linked with Dublin and nearby areas in modern times. Some dispute remains as to their origins. May also be a form of the Irish, O’Hagan or from O’Faodhagain of County Louth.

Woulfe mentions possible origins as a branch of O’Hagan while others disagree. Others believe Fagan to be a completely separate Irish family of ancient territory of Oriel.

The first of the name to be found is one ‘William Fagan’ who in 1200 ad held property in Dublin. The family developed branches in Co. Cork and Kerry. The Kerry branch held some notoriety in France in the 1700’s.

Keatings History mentions the O’Fagans as a numerous clan in Meath and Westmeath. One family head held the title of Baron of Feltrim in Fingal (Dublin).

Fagan, some of whom were called O’Fagan and Mac Fagan are considered to be of Irish origin, but according to others they were English or Danish in descent, and the name is still numerous in Counties, Meath, Westmeath and Dublin.

1659 Fagan was a rincipal name of Meath & found in Westmeath too.

The Fagan family of Feltrim, descends from Thomas Fagan of Dublin who married Amy Neagle in 1524.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:17

Surname: Keegan
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicized form of the Old Gaelic "MacAodhagain". The Gaelic prefix "mac" denotes "son of", and the personal name "Aodhagain" is a diminutive of "Aodh", "fire", originally the name of a pagan god. The great MacAodhagain sept originated in the ancient territory of Ui Maine (comprising mid-Galway and south Roscommon), where they held the hereditary office of "ollav" or awyer to the ruling families. A branch of this important Brehon (law-giving) family settled in the Leinster counties of Wicklow and Dublin, where the name was Anglicized Keegan, the original Anglicized form being Egan. Following the destruction of the Old Gaelic order, this sept held high office in the Church, and several of its members distinguished themselves in battle. On November 22nd 1792, Betty, daughter of William Keegan, was christened in Athy, Co. Kildare. Between January 1846 and June 1847 thirty-two Keegans are known to have arrived in New York as famine immigrants. The family Coat of Arms is a shield divided quarterly red and gold, with a silver tower supported on either side by a man in complete armour holding in the interior hand a battle-axe all proper, in the first and fourth quarters, and a green bend changed with three silver plates in the second and third. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Sarah Egan, which was dated 1226, marriage to Thomas L'Estrange, at Killaloe, Co. Clare, during the reign of King Henry 111 of England, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 14 Jan 2009 23:18

Surname: Brophy
This surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O'Broithe", the prefix "O" denoting male descendant of, plus the personal name "Broth". The surname is widespread in counties Leix and Kilkenny. According to the "Census" of 1659, Brophy was one of the principal names in five baronies of Queen's County (Leix), and in five of Co. Kilkenny. In Clandonagh it is perpetuated in the well known Co. Leix placename Ballybrophy. Variations in the spelling of the surname include Brohy, Brophey, Broffee, Broffey, and Broy. Church Records list the christenings of Edmund, son of Edmund and Margery Broffee, on January 13th 1725, at St. Martin in the Fields, Westminster, and of Mary, daughter of John and Susan Brophy, on July 27th 1788 in Ahasckaph, Co. Galway. One Bridget Brophy, aged 25 yrs., a famine emigrant, sailed from Liverpool aboard the "England" bound for New York on May 26th 1846. Daniel Brophy of Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny, three times mayor of Ballarat, Australia, was a well known public figure there in the 1870's. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Brophy, which was dated 1659, in the "Census of Population", during the reign of Richard Cromwell, known as "The Lord Protector", 1658 - 1660. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling