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Divorce records 1858-1911 now on Ancestry

ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

Chris in Sussex

Chris in Sussex Report 16 Jan 2013 16:48

Thanks to a poster on another Forum this was brought to my attention and I thought some people may be interested.

UK, Civil Divorce Records, 1858-1911
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=2465

FMP have the indices but Ancestry have now put up the actual papers so you get to read all the juicy stories ;-) and I have seen one with a copy of the original marriage certificate.

My lot were too poor to officially divorce but naturally being a nosey so and so I have had a look and the papers make interesting reading!

Happy hunting

Chris

George_of_Westbury

George_of_Westbury Report 16 Jan 2013 17:20

Chris

Thanks for this, they do make interesing reading.

Pity these were not on 6 months ago, i obtained a record from the Nat. Archives it cost me £12-75.

This ancestor of mine was only 16 when he married and divorced when he was 23, but there was a bit of lying on his marriage certificate he said he was 20.

If you are interested to have a look at mine, It relates to John Gervase Tinley petition for divorce from Jane Barr in 1880, easy to find it very interesting reading

I always thought as well, that divorce was only for the very rich but mine were certainly not.

George

Chrissie2394

Chrissie2394 Report 16 Jan 2013 18:23

Thanks for this.

Chrissie

Kucinta

Kucinta Report 16 Jan 2013 20:52

My relative William Henry Eayres was divorced twice during the C19th, and also cited in a Scottish divorce into the bargain. I found coverage of his first wife earlier suing for her restoration of her 'marital rights' in the papers of the day, but look forward to seeing the actual divorce details.

First wife Susanna Charlotte originally sued him for restoration of her marital rights, got an allowance, he didn't pay it, so she set a solicitor on him. She then formed an intimate relationship with said solicitor, and Henry was able to divorce her on those grounds.

Shortly after the divorce her brother in law got into a slanging match with her and her solicitor amour, who had set her up in a cigar shop. The solicitor managed to poke the brother in law in the eye with his umbrella, despite the intervention of a passing policeman, and the case went to court.

His second wife, giving evidence in the Scottish Divorce case, said she spotted a photograph of his mistress hidden in his violin case...

His third wife was a witness in the Scottish Divorce case, which set legal precedence in Scotland. The husband in question had originally forgiven his wife for her adultery with my relative, then Henry came up to Scotland for some winter concerts. The aggrieved husband had his wife followed, and sure enough she met up with Henry. However the court believed her story that she had only met him in order to retreive letters and items she had given him (turns out he always burnt the letters and had pawned the ring!), and since the husband had forgiven her, no further betrayal had taken place, the husband was forced to stay married to his wife.