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BEDROOM TAX

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

Diane

Diane Report 23 Mar 2013 02:29

nudged up for Sandie :-D :-D

Diane

Diane Report 12 Mar 2013 22:32

I am so made up that things have been changed for disabled children, foster carers and those that are away from home fighting for their country :-)
But as this Tax is an unfair one it should be completely scraped as there is now a case for discrimination against the disabled adult and other family's that will still be affected by this tax on the poorest of are people.
I for one will still be attending my local protest against this tax and continue to do so until it is abolished completely.

maggiewinchester

maggiewinchester Report 12 Mar 2013 22:31

"Additionally people who are approved foster carers will be allowed an additional room, whether or not a child has been placed with them or they are between placements, so long as they have fostered a child, or become an approved foster carer in the last 12 months."

...so, in future, anyone who lives in a council house and happens to be on housing benefits because, perhaps a working child has left, and wants to foster, will be unable to, because they will be moved into smaller accommodation.

TheBlackKnight

TheBlackKnight Report 12 Mar 2013 22:13



Iain Duncan Smith has decided to drop the case against a man with two disabled daughters who had been denied extra housing benefit on the basis that his children should share a bedroom.

The Department of Work and Pensions had argued that Richard Gorry, who has three children including two disabled daughters, one with spina bifida and another with Down’s Syndrome, should only receive housing benefit for a three bedroom property.

However Mr Gorry had appealed against the decision, saying that because of needs related to their disability, they could not always share a bedroom.

The Court of Appeal ruled on 15 May that the Local Housing Allowance (LHA) size criteria had discriminated unlawfully against the children in the Gorry family on grounds of disability. However the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions disagreed and applied to the Supreme Court to appeal that decision.

However late on Tuesday, Duncan Smith decided not to pursue the appeal. A statement from the DWP read: “The Secretary of State has today clarified the position regarding disabled children and has decided not to pursue the appeal further."

This means that local authorities can now allow an extra bedroom for children who are unable to share because of their severe disabilities.

The work and pensions secretary also said adult children who are in the Armed Forces but who continue to live with parents will be treated as continuing to live at home, even when deployed on operations.

Additionally people who are approved foster carers will be allowed an additional room, whether or not a child has been placed with them or they are between placements, so long as they have fostered a child, or become an approved foster carer in the last 12 months.

Child Poverty Action Group was representing Richard Gorry. Alison Garnham, Chief Executive said: “This is a tremendous victory for disabled children and it’s a victory for common sense.

“In the case Child Poverty Action Group represented, it was clearly not possible for a child with spina bifida and another with Down Syndrome to share a bedroom together with such different demands and needs. It’s absolutely right that the housing benefit system should respond to challenges like this, and it is clear discrimination if it does not.

“Even with today’s decision on severely disabled children, disabled people will still be amongst the hardest hit by the bedroom tax, with £300 million being cut from their housing support. The bedroom tax is surely one of the cruellest cuts of all and should be scrapped altogether.”

AnninGlos

AnninGlos Report 10 Mar 2013 14:56

Another law not thought through properly.

♥†۩ Carol   Paine ۩†♥

♥†۩ Carol Paine ۩†♥ Report 10 Mar 2013 14:01

This will be so hard to implement , with the shortage of one bedded accommodation, that by the time several people get offered a smaller home those under 10's will be over 10 & others will have had their 65th Birthday.

The idea of selling off council housing, was that the money from these sales would be spent on building more, but this did not happen.

Diane

Diane Report 10 Mar 2013 02:00

Hi Kemp,
having a lodger is what the goverment have suggested ( not sub letting ) Lodger is not classed as sub letting,

Lodgers

A lodger is somebody that is not part of your family but lives in your home (usually in return for a payment). They may have their own room, but will share at least one meal a day with the family, and probably share the living room as well.

Sub-letting

Sub-letting is where a tenant lets part (or all) of their home to somebody else. They will have a part of the house or flat for their exclusive use (usually a bedroom), will take all their meals independently and will not share any living areas except the bathroom, kitchen and access areas like the hall, stairs and landings.

KempinaPartyhat

KempinaPartyhat Report 9 Mar 2013 10:29

Can I just say

Some house rent contracts say the person renting the house cant sub let .....so therefore spare rooms cant be let by the renter only the landlord!!!

OneFootInTheGrave

OneFootInTheGrave Report 9 Mar 2013 10:09

From The Daily Mirror today - Even Tory MP's tell David Cameron to scrap the bedroom tax

Rattled David Cameron came under more pressure yesterday as his own MP's joined protests against the hated bedroom tax.

Government figures show it will leave people £14 a week worse off on average, and it also admitted it could deter up to 5,000 potential foster parents as fostered children would not be counted as occupants.

Bosses of 11 charities, including Fostering Network, Barnados and Action for Children, have warned of the dire consequences, saying “These new rules will make it even more difficult for people in social housing to become foster carers at a time when we urgently need more to come forward.”

Also, parents of soldiers who live at home but are away serving their country will also be hit.

terryj

terryj Report 8 Mar 2013 23:51

wife was at a conference this week on asb and towards the end of the conference someone from bham city council spoke about the bedroom tax and asb and stated they expected an increase in petty crime shop lifting etc and an increase in the handling of stolen goods as deperate people look to survive

don't forget on top of the bedroom tax people on benefit are going to have to pay part of their council tax which in bham is expected to be 8%
if you are in private rented you get lha instead of hb and that is more draconian
under 30 and single you are entitled to £50 a week for a room in a shared house

Diane

Diane Report 8 Mar 2013 23:27

It was my HA that said it first and then when I queried it with the Council benefits they agreed :-(
I don't think half of them know what's what themselves with all the different changes.
On that link you put up for Nottingham Council it said their percentage was to be 10%, our's is going to be 20%, this is because each Council is working it at what they can afford I'v even heard one Council will be charging 30% and their are other not charging people on benefits anything, its like a bl...y lottery :-(

Kucinta

Kucinta Report 8 Mar 2013 23:06

Thanks for clarifying, Diane. At least it's not more bad news!

Shocking that the benefits office mislead you though.

Seems folks affected by the bedroom tax have enough on their plate already, without the benefit office adding to their angst with misinformation.

Diane

Diane Report 8 Mar 2013 22:54

Kucinta yes according to a goverment link it says you will still get it, so my benefits office have misinformed me. Sorry if I worried anyone :-(

Kucinta

Kucinta Report 8 Mar 2013 21:36

I found this:

"Will the Single Person discount change?

No. The 25% single person's discount will not change. A full list of the current Council Tax discounts and exemptions is available online at www.mynottingham.gov.uk/counciltax"

http://www.nottinghamcity.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=19593

Phew!

Kucinta

Kucinta Report 8 Mar 2013 21:33

Diane - I can find information that council tax benefit ends beginning of April, but can't find anything about single occupancy discount being ended at the same time. Can you point me in the right direction?

Eeyore13

Eeyore13 Report 8 Mar 2013 21:13

Diane-I didn't know that & I expect a lot of people are unaware, makes you wonder how bad things are going to get :-(

Diane

Diane Report 8 Mar 2013 20:42

Eeyore just to say the 25% single occupancy is being done away with in April :-(

Eeyore13

Eeyore13 Report 8 Mar 2013 20:36

MaggieW I think you'd have to do the References & Rent Book route as my OH has poined out someone on their own would lose the single occupancy off their Council Tax so it's not a great loophole.

Diane-I'd feel like that
:-|

Diane

Diane Report 8 Mar 2013 19:27

Well loophole or not I would never take in a stranger into my home as a lodger, I could come home and find my flat empty of all my belongings.
I would maybe consider a relative but only out of desperation, my flat is small and I like my own space.

Joy i won't be adding to that baby boom lol.

maggiewinchester

maggiewinchester Report 8 Mar 2013 18:53

But, as I said earlier, how can it be proved they're a lodger and not a co-habitee?
It's yet another loophole.
'He/she's not my partner, they're my lodger'.
So not only can they still claim housing benefit, they can (illegally) still claim child benefits.