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Aincha

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RolloTheRed

RolloTheRed Report 15 Nov 2017 10:38

for Prickly Holly and others who have the sub titles on when watchjing "East Enders" .

Mother phoned up last night, she was goin' spare
She was in a temper pulling out her hair
"You're sister's courtin' a scruffy looking gent
Father don't give a monkeys and this is what he said"

I don't care, I don't care
I don't care if he comes round here
I got my beer in the sideboard here
Let Mother sort it out if he comes round here

I said to me mother, "Let me 'ave a talk to Dad"
So he comes to the telephone, he wasn't half mad
Said, "She's got no sense, silly little cow
And if he comes round here there's gonna be a row"

I don't care, I don't care
I don't care if he comes round here
I got my beer in the sideboard here
Let Mother sort it out if he comes round here

"I'll tell ya something else an' all, he's never got a job
He hangs around the betting shop, the lazy little yob
Mother says, "Calm down now, Dad, he's alright,"
But they're out there snogging in the passage all night"

I don't care, I don't care
I don't care if he comes round here
I got my beer in the sideboard here
Let Mother sort it out if he comes round here

If he comes round here, I've got my beer, let Mother sort it out
In the sideboard here, got my beer, let Mother sort it out
I don't care if he comes round here

"You'd think he was a tramp with the stubble on his chin
He looks like something that the cat brought in
Never got no money, smokes all my fags
Got holes in his soles and he's hanging in rags"

"On top of that he said to tell ya why I got the 'ump
She had a skinny little belly, now its sticking out the front
Nothing seems to fit her and she's running out of clothes
If he keeps on taking liberties, I'll punch him on the nose"

I don't care, I don't care
I don't care if he comes round here
I got my beer in the sideboard here
Let Mother sort it out if he comes round here

If he comes round here, I've got my beer, let Mother sort it out
In the sideboard here, got my beer, let Mother sort it out
I don't care if he comes round here

SIDEBOARD SONG, THE
(Chas Hodges / Dave Peacock)
1979

AnninGlos

AnninGlos Report 15 Nov 2017 11:55

:-D :-D :-D

Nyx

Nyx Report 15 Nov 2017 11:59

I like a bit of Chas and Dave :-)

Re accents I am pretty good with them, which I think comes from moving around a lot. Wirral to London via east and west and south . perhaps it develops your 'ear'?

I was surprised when my Wirral friend complained that the Scouse accent of someone on TV was incomprehensible to her as she's only a mile across the Mersey.

Here's a question :-D Does anyone else still use the term "sideboard" ?

RolloTheRed

RolloTheRed Report 15 Nov 2017 12:22

In French sideboards are called "le buffet" which to me conjours up visions of steamy sooty railway stations and ham sandwiches. Still we speak French at home so "buffet" it is. The piece here was bought used from his flash rellie by my GF art deco late 20s. No , I don't keep my beer in it. Rellie was killed by a buzz bomb (update: with some others nr Harrods). The spot is marked with a blue plaque. Should gave stayed closer to his sideboard.

Nyx

Nyx Report 15 Nov 2017 12:37

We had a succession of sideboards, mum being an auction goer, some were sold on quite quickly or had to go when we moved.

Just having a browse on ebay at 'sideboards I have known' and note that many of them have the term "buffet" in the description. 'Buffet' conjures up weddings and funerals, quiche and sandwiches :-D

They don't make railway stations like that any more :-( Tasting of soot and sausage rolls, weighing and luggage tag machines, posters of exotic destinations and wonderful trains whooshing steam :-D

JingleJems

JingleJems Report 15 Nov 2017 12:43

Yes I do Nyx!

Although I do not have a sideboard at the moment, just those units with display cases on the top.

maggiewinchester

maggiewinchester Report 15 Nov 2017 13:09

I too, still use the term 'sideboard' - and 'railway station'.
I've got on a bus before and asked for the 'railway station', to be met with a disgruntled 'Where?'
'Train station', I reply - and the bus driver understands :-(

MotownGal

MotownGal Report 15 Nov 2017 13:20

I still say I'm listening to The Wireless!

:-(

JoyLouise

JoyLouise Report 15 Nov 2017 13:26

I still call my sideboard by that name. It ain't a dresser as it ends at about waist height and has no 'upstairs' cupboards or shelves).

Railway station is that to me too. Same as bus station.

What I now call a sofa was once a settee to me and a couch to my OH. I don't recall when it stopped being a settee but I guess I adopted the language of wherever we lived at the time.

Up the dancers is still that to me (up the stairs to most people - or even apples and pears).

It is truly a wonderful world with rich and varied dialects and accents. Ain't it fab!


:-D :-D :-D

BrendafromWales

BrendafromWales Report 15 Nov 2017 13:31

I use the term ‘sideboard’ too,bu5 then I am old.I have an Art Deco sideboard in my living room and a pine one in my conservatory..I prefer well built furniture to flat pack.

My father was a very good carpenter and I was brought up to look for dove tailed joints etc.

One of the nicest when I had a guest house was a Walnut chefanier, very large,but beautiful.its a shame now when I see the most beautiful brown furniture going for a song in charity shops.Quality! :-)

Dermot

Dermot Report 15 Nov 2017 14:18

'Primary schoolchildren with strong regional accents are less likely to move away from their roots as adults.' (Daily Express).

JoyLouise

JoyLouise Report 15 Nov 2017 14:39

Ooh, Dermot. I can get into hot water with my kids if I don't speak in the regional accent they have adopted. I forget sometimes ..... blame it on old age. ;-) :-D

I just can't do accents as well as they can do them.

I can also be admonished for my telephone voice. They fall about laughing or, worse still, mimic me while I am on the phone, to the point that I fall about laughing. :-D

Andysmum

Andysmum Report 15 Nov 2017 15:41

We have a sideboard. It's well-made, solid and dates from 1915. It cost us £15, but has recently passed its centenary and is officially an antique. I don't know if that makes it more valuable though. :-) :-)

My mother always said my sister was bi-lingual. She spoke "proper" English indoors, and switched to the local accent and dialect when with her friends.

maggiewinchester

maggiewinchester Report 15 Nov 2017 15:45

As someone who changed schools - a lot - survival depended on speaking in the local dialect/regional accent!! :-\

Moving from Malta (where we spoke 'cultured' English - rather like Enid Blyton characters), to the North East of Scotland meant a swift change of accent.
My (then aged 10) year old sister was actually asked by a teacher how she could stand being a 'Nationalistic' English person :-|
A move to the South East of Scotland - different agai!

Then moving from Scotland to Cornwall - well if you wanted to be understood. my you, you'm better get 'proper' linguistics pronto!
The worst (for me) was moving from Cornwall to Devon - yes the dialects/words used are totally different :-| :-|

As a family, when we get together, you'll more than likely find us all speaking in different dialects - from broad Scottish to a strong 'Brummie' - not because we live there - just because we can :-D

MotownGal

MotownGal Report 15 Nov 2017 16:15

During the 'slum clearances' (their words, not mine) of the East End, after WW2.
They were moved to the New Towns in Essex.

And the accent went with them.

Just go to Lakeside Shopping Centre, and you will hear it in all its glory!

PricklyHolly

PricklyHolly Report 15 Nov 2017 21:09

For your information Rollo......

I don't do "East Enders"........or any other "Soap Operas" for that matter.

Allan

Allan Report 16 Nov 2017 11:23

:-D :-D :-D :-D@PH

RolloTheRed

RolloTheRed Report 16 Nov 2017 11:48

one of my mates used to run Robert Dyas at Lakeside but has now moved on to Colchester. Good decision.

maggiewinchester

maggiewinchester Report 20 Nov 2017 23:43

Rollo, for an alleged Socialist - you certainly harbour a high degree of snobbery.

supercrutch

supercrutch Report 21 Nov 2017 00:05

Poor Robert Dyas, he should be allowed to walk ;-)