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Baroness Thatcher

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ProfilePosted byOptionsPost Date

Muffyxx

Muffyxx Report 9 Apr 2013 16:46

I never like the school milk either Janet...it was always warm...stank from the floating cream on top of the bottle and reeked the classroom out in the summer lol.

It put me off drinking milk for years.

**edit** but I like Ice cream too :-D

Gins

Gins Report 9 Apr 2013 16:47

Did Mrs Thatcher once refer to Nelson Mandela (ANC) as a 'terrorist' ?

Ooops

Guinevere

Guinevere Report 9 Apr 2013 16:48

Stealing from the weak is bad politics whatever your party.

The money saved was a drop in the ocean and put some farmers who relied on it to keep going out of their dairy farms.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 9 Apr 2013 16:50

Nelson Mandela - now there is a hero if ever there was one - a lovely gentle man who did so much for his country in spite of what his country did to him

Muffyxx

Muffyxx Report 9 Apr 2013 16:50

We'll have to agree to disagree on this one Guinevere...I don't consider removing free school milk where it was no longer rationed and readily available as stealing from the weak......sorry.

Guinevere

Guinevere Report 9 Apr 2013 16:53

Ok, no probs. Off to work now.

Wonderful man, Ann. And not a terrorist.

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 9 Apr 2013 16:53

the thing is Guinevere - Margaret Thatcher never suffered deprivation of any kind - we were very poor indeed when I was a child though I never felt deprived, but in comparison to her I probably was - no bathroom, no indoor toilet, no electricity, had to walk everywhere, including two miles each way to school along a country road from when I was five years old

~Lynda~

~Lynda~ Report 9 Apr 2013 16:57

If I remember correctly a pint of milk was about 5 or 6d in "old money" in 1970, that's about 2 and a half pence. My Mum was a milk lady for my school in the early 50's, and the milk had to be left near a radiator to keep warm :-0
I doubt schools would be able to have milk now anyway, children can't take it in to school in there packed lunch, and the schools wouldn't be able to keep it at the right temperature, that it's needed to be kept at.

As for rent a mob, a lot of them don't know what they are protesting about, they just like a day out to cause trouble :-( I went to "view" the camp site outside St Pauls, when the mob took it over, although there were mobile toilets provided, urine ran down the square, there was graffiti everywhere, notes stuck on shop windows, tents everywhere, with hardly anyone staying in them, a book tent a food tent, and a tent for "ladies who felt vulnerable", what's that about ? it looked disgusting. I have no problem with people protesting, but i do have a problem with those who have no respect for others, and those who do it, just for the sake of it :-(

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 9 Apr 2013 17:03

a lot of them looked far too young to have known what it was all about

Porkie_Pie

Porkie_Pie Report 9 Apr 2013 17:04

Putting up tax rates on the higher earners was not an option in the 1970's they already paid income tax of 75% for those earning abt 20K plus and with surcharges and taxes on investments it was as high as 90% which led to people leaving the UK taking their money, investment, and skills with them

Roy





LilyL

LilyL Report 9 Apr 2013 17:04

I wonder?!!! I seem to remember (to my shame) throwing the daily milk ration down the sink, as did most of my friends particularly as we got older! I think it was a Labour government that stopped free milk in Secondary Schools in the 1960's; (we never hear about that) Mrs T stopped it in Primary Schools, but of course is vilified, leading a lot of people who probably weren't even born to now be under the impression that she was responsible for the stoppage of free milk in ALL schools! a tad unfair, but then rioting in the streets to celebrate the death of someone who has been out of power for the past 20 odd years is not only unfair but completely moronic. Destroying peoples livelihoods is exactly what Mrs T was, and is accused of - well what in heavens name were they doing last night in Bristol? destroying shops and business's!!!! doesn't make sense, again completely pathetic!!!

AnninGlos

AnninGlos Report 9 Apr 2013 17:05

Lynda, as Alan Sugar alledgedly remarked (No I am not a fan of his) ' most of those protesting were feeding from teats in the 80s'.

Cynthia

Cynthia Report 9 Apr 2013 17:11

I would have been shocked too Errol and tempted to speak to her with regard to her behaviour, especially as customers were within earshot.


What is happening to the respect and dignity once associated with death and grief?


I found this article - from 2011

SHOW some respect.

That’s the call from a funeral director overseeing the final journeys of loved ones in Bournemouth and Poole as a new report reveals one in six drivers has witnessed motorists swearing and making hand gestures at corteges.

Steven Dabin, area manager for the Poole and Bournemouth division of Co-operative Funeral Care, said grieving families travelling to funerals were left distressed by rude drivers.

“I’m afraid it is true. There is a lack of courtesy shown sometimes.

“We drive slowly as a mark of respect, and that tends to create a queue behind us.

“If people see us coming, they try to get in front of us, even to the point of people cutting into the middle of the cortege between the hearse and the family’s car,” he said.

One in 12 drivers quizzed by the survey said they didn’t know that it was considered respectful not to overtake the funeral procession.


Doesn't say much for our society, does it? :-(

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 9 Apr 2013 17:13

when I was young it was practice to stand still when a cortege passed

Mauatthecoast

Mauatthecoast Report 9 Apr 2013 17:15

Children under the age of five in approved childcare are provided with a third of a pint of milk a day.

In 1940 milk was issued to pregnant women and young children to protect them against wartime food shortages.

My son loved school milk but my daughter (and most of her friends) did not.
i know for a fact that at their school lots of milk was wasted and thrown away!!


edit: regarding funeral processions we were always taught to respect a passing cortege.
I always stand at the roadside, would never ever try and pass while driving.
But I'm afraid there are a lot of ignorant folk in this world of ours.:-(

Rambling Rose

Rambling Rose Report 9 Apr 2013 17:25

It was evening street parties, and even in the Mail it does say that many who joined in were there for the "revelry" rather than political motivation.

That does not excuse the events getting out of hand in some places of course, but it wasn't ALL setting out to "riot"...in many cases the street parties were rowdy, disrespectful, drunken...but not 'rioting' as such.

People feel very strongly about Mrs Thatcher, simply because there WAS a great deal of 'us and them' about many of her policies. It is inevitable that the most strident will have something to say...for or against but I personally would prefer the funeral to be dignified, on behalf of all concerned,as I think all funerals should be...then move on.

AnninGlos

AnninGlos Report 9 Apr 2013 17:25

With regard to the ignorant lady in the library, I would be tempted to speak to her superiors. Whatever her personal feeling, if she was an employee (I know a lot are volunteers now), she is a public servant and, as such should show respect.

Muffyxx

Muffyxx Report 9 Apr 2013 17:26

I'm afraid I would've challenged her.........but then that's what gets me into doo-doo much of the time :-D

AnnCardiff

AnnCardiff Report 9 Apr 2013 17:27

one of the worst things to occur under her reign was the forming of NHS Trusts

Changes under the Thatcher governmentThe 1980s saw the introduction of modern management processes (General Management) in the NHS to replace the previous system of consensus management. This was outlined in the Griffiths Report of 1983.[46] This recommended the appointment of general managers in the NHS with whom responsibility should lie. The report also recommended that clinicians be better involved in management. Financial pressures continued to place strain on the NHS. In 1987, an additional £101 million was provided by the government to the NHS. In 1988 Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher announced a review of the NHS. From this review in 1989 two white papers Working for Patients and Caring for People were produced. These outlined the introduction of what was termed the "internal market", which was to shape the structure and organisation of health services for most of the next decade.

In England, the National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990 defined this "internal market", whereby health authorities ceased to run hospitals but "purchased" care from their own or other authorities' hospitals. Certain GPs became "fund holders" and were able to purchase care for their patients. The "providers" became independent trusts, which encouraged competition but also increased local differences. Increasing competition may have been statistically associated with poor patient outcomes.[47]

Porkie_Pie

Porkie_Pie Report 9 Apr 2013 17:30

Nelson Mandela, Yes he is a very inspirational man but don't conveniently forget that in his younger days he did lose faith in the legal processes and turned to terrorism, He was a co founder in the armed wing of the ANC "Spear of the Nation" Which is why people say he was a terrorist

Roy